The Young Adult Section

i’m the worst blogger i know
i am so sorry y’all
i’m doing a review of The Fault in Our Stars ASAP
and also several others
i have a to-do list
i promise

-H

The Hunger Games - Suzanne Collins
A mini-review for the holidays
Ah, The Hunger Games - the next phenomenon. An amazing read. I read it in anticipation for the movie coming out early next year, and I was entranced. It’s fast-paced, suspenseful, and a bit sad.
It begins in a dystopian society where Katniss, a sixteen-year-old girl from District Twelve, the lowest-end district of the country of Panem, enters herself into The Hunger Games to save her sister. The Hunger Games are an annual event where 24 “tributes” from the ages of twelve to eighteen are selected to fight to the death in an outdoor arena, as punishment for an earlier rebellion. Katniss befriends another District Twelve tribute, Peeta, but loses track of him during the Games themselves. 
The Games are full of suspense and heartbreak, and during these chapters the book was impossible to put down. I really loved this one - dark and foreboding of what our society and society like ours are capable of, it captured me into every page. With just a hint of romance, Collins balances out a beautifully written novel, the beginning of a trilogy that would spark a worldwide Hunger Games obsession. 
Definitely worth reading again and again!

The Hunger Games - Suzanne Collins

A mini-review for the holidays

Ah, The Hunger Games - the next phenomenon. An amazing read. I read it in anticipation for the movie coming out early next year, and I was entranced. It’s fast-paced, suspenseful, and a bit sad.

It begins in a dystopian society where Katniss, a sixteen-year-old girl from District Twelve, the lowest-end district of the country of Panem, enters herself into The Hunger Games to save her sister. The Hunger Games are an annual event where 24 “tributes” from the ages of twelve to eighteen are selected to fight to the death in an outdoor arena, as punishment for an earlier rebellion. Katniss befriends another District Twelve tribute, Peeta, but loses track of him during the Games themselves. 

The Games are full of suspense and heartbreak, and during these chapters the book was impossible to put down. I really loved this one - dark and foreboding of what our society and society like ours are capable of, it captured me into every page. With just a hint of romance, Collins balances out a beautifully written novel, the beginning of a trilogy that would spark a worldwide Hunger Games obsession. 

Definitely worth reading again and again!

We do not grow absolutely, chronologically. We grow sometimes in one dimension, and not in another; unevenly. We grow partially. We are relative. We are mature in one realm, childish in another. The past, present, and future mingle and pull us backward, forward, or fix us in the present. We are made up of layers, cells, constellations.
- Anaïs Nin (via booklover)

Thoughts….

If you have a book you want us to review, perhaps a summer reading assignment or something that’s been sitting in a pile by your bed for a few months, we will gladly do so! Now that it’s summer there will be a lot of reading time around working part-time summer jobs, and our to-do list is getting shorter and shorter! 

If you want a review done, submit the book title, author, and genre here.

Thanks!

A Great And Terrible Beauty - Libba Bray : Part One of the Gemma Doyle Trilogy
I just finished this series for the second time and the impact it made on me the second time around was even greater than the first.  Plus I just adore the Victorian era, and you can really feel it in this book. If you like historical fiction, you will enjoy this book.
This novel centers around Gemma Doyle, a teenage girl living in the Victorian era, from a wealthy, respectable family. Her family moves from India, where she was raised, when her mother is mysteriously killed. She becomes a debutante and is in a courtship with one of the finest young bachelors in London, all while haunted by prophetic visions. When she goes to boarding school at Spence Academy, she struggles with the social constraints of the era along with the rules at Spence. Gemma befriends the high-status clique of the academy, and runs across a gypsy tribe, meeting a young man named Kartik, and an elegant, passionate romance blooms. Gemma learns the story behind the forbidden, burned East Wing of Spence and finds a diary written twenty years prior and discovers something unorthodox about herself and her mother - that they both held magic, and the ability to pass into the Realms, a magical place that at first seems like a heaven but eventually reveals itself to be a place overrun with dark magic as well as good magic. Gemma and her friends must journey into the realms and defeat the dark magic - but without knowledge of the magic’s extent, they have a long journey in front of them.
Libba Bray’s novel is purely magical and bursting with romance, mystery, passion and elegance. Her writing is brilliant and the book overall is a delicious, beautiful, under the covers, dark and rich gothic. It is a gorgeous beginning to a gorgeous trilogy. The fantasy is juxtaposed with reality, and it creates a fresh take on both the coming-of-age novel and the paradigm of fantasy novels.

A Great And Terrible Beauty - Libba Bray : Part One of the Gemma Doyle Trilogy

I just finished this series for the second time and the impact it made on me the second time around was even greater than the first.  Plus I just adore the Victorian era, and you can really feel it in this book. If you like historical fiction, you will enjoy this book.

This novel centers around Gemma Doyle, a teenage girl living in the Victorian era, from a wealthy, respectable family. Her family moves from India, where she was raised, when her mother is mysteriously killed. She becomes a debutante and is in a courtship with one of the finest young bachelors in London, all while haunted by prophetic visions. When she goes to boarding school at Spence Academy, she struggles with the social constraints of the era along with the rules at Spence. Gemma befriends the high-status clique of the academy, and runs across a gypsy tribe, meeting a young man named Kartik, and an elegant, passionate romance blooms. Gemma learns the story behind the forbidden, burned East Wing of Spence and finds a diary written twenty years prior and discovers something unorthodox about herself and her mother - that they both held magic, and the ability to pass into the Realms, a magical place that at first seems like a heaven but eventually reveals itself to be a place overrun with dark magic as well as good magic. Gemma and her friends must journey into the realms and defeat the dark magic - but without knowledge of the magic’s extent, they have a long journey in front of them.

Libba Bray’s novel is purely magical and bursting with romance, mystery, passion and elegance. Her writing is brilliant and the book overall is a delicious, beautiful, under the covers, dark and rich gothic. It is a gorgeous beginning to a gorgeous trilogy. The fantasy is juxtaposed with reality, and it creates a fresh take on both the coming-of-age novel and the paradigm of fantasy novels.

We haven’t posted at all recently!

I’m sorry guys, we’ll be back really soon! 

I’m the main writer on here and I was really sick recently, which left me a lot of time to read! So I didn’t post, but I read a LOT of books (two trilogies & a stand alone novel) and I will be assaulting your senses with them ASAP.

Thanks ever so much! And don’t forget to spread the word about the Young Adult Section, we want to impact as many teen readers as possible!

It’s Kind of a Funny Story by Ned Vizzini
I read this book three times. In a week. 
It’s Kind of a Funny Story is the chronicles of a 15-year-old New York City teen, Craig Gilner, who suffers from anxiety, stress, and relationship trouble - something all teenagers can relate to. It’s different for Craig, because he’s been diagnosed with clinical depression, and after struggling with it for a while, unable to eat, sleep, or get peace of mind, he considers suicide and winds up checked into Algernon hospital’s Adult Psych hospital (“it’s not a ward, it’s a hospital”) , Six North. In Six North, he heals, he contemplates, and he changes completely.
This book thoroughly changed my perspective on life, and Craig’s struggles are so similar to a lot of teens - this book shows you that you are not alone.
It’s Kind of a Funny Story is brilliantly written, and an amazing book - but just FYI, the movie kind of sucks. It’s not even very similar to the book, and you can see it if you want, but as always, the book is better.
This book is life-changing, mind-altering, and so accessible to teens. I love this book so much - it was hard to part with it, even though I was just loaning it to a friend.

It’s Kind of a Funny Story by Ned Vizzini

I read this book three times. In a week. 

It’s Kind of a Funny Story is the chronicles of a 15-year-old New York City teen, Craig Gilner, who suffers from anxiety, stress, and relationship trouble - something all teenagers can relate to. It’s different for Craig, because he’s been diagnosed with clinical depression, and after struggling with it for a while, unable to eat, sleep, or get peace of mind, he considers suicide and winds up checked into Algernon hospital’s Adult Psych hospital (“it’s not a ward, it’s a hospital”) , Six North. In Six North, he heals, he contemplates, and he changes completely.

This book thoroughly changed my perspective on life, and Craig’s struggles are so similar to a lot of teens - this book shows you that you are not alone.

It’s Kind of a Funny Story is brilliantly written, and an amazing book - but just FYI, the movie kind of sucks. It’s not even very similar to the book, and you can see it if you want, but as always, the book is better.

This book is life-changing, mind-altering, and so accessible to teens. I love this book so much - it was hard to part with it, even though I was just loaning it to a friend.

Elsewhere by Gabrielle Zevin
I could literally talk about this book forever. 
It was so good, not in a life-changing, quote lines from it all day long kind of book - it’s a book you’ve probably read, and it’s lovable in its unique spin on death, and ultimately, life. It’s a quiet book, not telling you how to change, or making bold statements about the world today - but i read it seven times, and it was different every time i read it. 
Unlike other books, this one begins with the death of the protagonist. Poor Lizzie Hall has been killed at sixteen, and finds herself on a journey to and through the afterlife that’s uplifting and inspiring. She had so much to look forward to about getting older - her license, falling in love, going to college. But when she lands in Elsewhere - the land of the afterlife when time moves backwards and you only get younger - how can she not be troubled? She will never get to be older, be able to do all the things she wanted to do. 
Liz’s story is one of hope, and realizing that when you want something, when you long for something, you don’t need to depend on anyone but yourself to get you there. She taught me that you are all you need to be happy.
Thank you, Liz, and thank you Gabrielle Zevin - your unique view has afforded all of us readers with a new view of the world and what is to come. 

*If you’ve read this book before, read it again. It will be different this time around.*

Elsewhere by Gabrielle Zevin

I could literally talk about this book forever. 

It was so good, not in a life-changing, quote lines from it all day long kind of book - it’s a book you’ve probably read, and it’s lovable in its unique spin on death, and ultimately, life. It’s a quiet book, not telling you how to change, or making bold statements about the world today - but i read it seven times, and it was different every time i read it. 

Unlike other books, this one begins with the death of the protagonist. Poor Lizzie Hall has been killed at sixteen, and finds herself on a journey to and through the afterlife that’s uplifting and inspiring. She had so much to look forward to about getting older - her license, falling in love, going to college. But when she lands in Elsewhere - the land of the afterlife when time moves backwards and you only get younger - how can she not be troubled? She will never get to be older, be able to do all the things she wanted to do. 

Liz’s story is one of hope, and realizing that when you want something, when you long for something, you don’t need to depend on anyone but yourself to get you there. She taught me that you are all you need to be happy.

Thank you, Liz, and thank you Gabrielle Zevin - your unique view has afforded all of us readers with a new view of the world and what is to come. 

*If you’ve read this book before, read it again. It will be different this time around.*


Jonathan Tropper - This is Where I Leave You
I read this book - which I had to go to three stores to find - from a simple tweet by Dianna Agron, who recommended it because she was reading it. It’s a more adult book than any of the others I’ll post here, but it was satirical and hilarious in a subtle way.  
Centered around a man who had a good life - hot wife, money in the bank, nice house, steady job - until he lost all of that, and most importantly his happiness, when his wife cheated on him. He goes to visit his family and hilarity ensues, along with the drama of family and brotherhood. 
Jonathan Tropper captures the soul of the reader flawlessly, until you get lost in the life of poor Judd Foxman. He desperately tries to rebuild himself as he gets lost in his life, overwhelmed with losses and a seemingly hopeless situation.
Tropper’s novel is funny, and satirical, and heartbreaking, and it also teaches a lesson that us teens need to learn - it may seem like the world is ending, but you will always overcome.

Jonathan Tropper - This is Where I Leave You

I read this book - which I had to go to three stores to find - from a simple tweet by Dianna Agron, who recommended it because she was reading it. It’s a more adult book than any of the others I’ll post here, but it was satirical and hilarious in a subtle way.  

Centered around a man who had a good life - hot wife, money in the bank, nice house, steady job - until he lost all of that, and most importantly his happiness, when his wife cheated on him. He goes to visit his family and hilarity ensues, along with the drama of family and brotherhood. 

Jonathan Tropper captures the soul of the reader flawlessly, until you get lost in the life of poor Judd Foxman. He desperately tries to rebuild himself as he gets lost in his life, overwhelmed with losses and a seemingly hopeless situation.

Tropper’s novel is funny, and satirical, and heartbreaking, and it also teaches a lesson that us teens need to learn - it may seem like the world is ending, but you will always overcome.

Stephen Chbosky - The Perks of Being a Wallflower
Standing on the Fringes of Life…
The Perks of Being a Wallflower is a truly unique novel about growing up - it takes Charlie, the protagonist, who’s eccentric and has (metaphorically) stood on the sidelines of life so far, and makes his thoughts our thoughts.
Charlie is brilliant in a complex way - he’s not excessively academically bright but his mind functions philosophically. He’s complex but easy to understand - he makes his points, but you have to think on them for a while to really try to understand him.
This book is compiled of Charlie’s letters to you, the reader. You are his confidante and you learn his life, true thoughts and feelings through these letters. Charlie is a freshman in high school, just starting out. He’s finally getting into life, “participating” as he calls it - he makes a few good friends, learns secrets, and explores sex, drugs, and the Rocky Horror Picture Show.
Charlie taught me how to be a better person; he taught me how to feel like a part of something, he taught me the importance of remembering the small moments as well as the big ones, and most importantly, Charlie taught me how to feel infinite.

Stephen Chbosky - The Perks of Being a Wallflower

Standing on the Fringes of Life…

The Perks of Being a Wallflower is a truly unique novel about growing up - it takes Charlie, the protagonist, who’s eccentric and has (metaphorically) stood on the sidelines of life so far, and makes his thoughts our thoughts.

Charlie is brilliant in a complex way - he’s not excessively academically bright but his mind functions philosophically. He’s complex but easy to understand - he makes his points, but you have to think on them for a while to really try to understand him.

This book is compiled of Charlie’s letters to you, the reader. You are his confidante and you learn his life, true thoughts and feelings through these letters. Charlie is a freshman in high school, just starting out. He’s finally getting into life, “participating” as he calls it - he makes a few good friends, learns secrets, and explores sex, drugs, and the Rocky Horror Picture Show.

Charlie taught me how to be a better person; he taught me how to feel like a part of something, he taught me the importance of remembering the small moments as well as the big ones, and most importantly, Charlie taught me how to feel infinite.

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